Joy of Childhood

10 05 2013

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The best time in our life….childhood!

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Malay Siam Cowboy…

30 04 2013

http://m.flickr.com/photos/dinbrasco/8680258713/lightbox/http://m.flickr.com/photos/dinbrasco/8680258713/lightbox/

This should be my best streets potraits ever captured. This image look horrible on the camera display, but then when downloaded to the workstation, its look differently….then realise that some professional already advice me that never rely too much to the camera screen…trust your larger monitor screen. Yes its true…

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The Lost Rare Photos of Kedah Royal Family…

4 10 2012

The Lost Rare Photos of Kedah Royal Family...

This is an image of HRH Allayarhamah Tengku Hajar Binti Sultan Abdul Hamid, Untie of HRH Yang Di-Pertuan Agong of Malaysia-Sultan Abdul Halim, captured by her younger brother; Tengku Abdul Majid Bin Sultan Abdul Hamid in 1920.
This is very rare photos that un-publish in any media that given to me by her grandson, Syed Ahmad Kamal Bin Syed Khalid Al-Shahbuddin.

Born in 1901-1971 and this image capture in her sweet 20’s 1920.





I’m Maybe Not A Photographer

23 02 2011

Am I a photographer??

Photographers carry around big cameras, big lights, big flash contraptions and little meters, they talk about film stock, ISO’s, F stops and capturing the perfect light right before dusk.

Photographers creep through neighborhoods of poor people looking for interesting poverty related things to “capture” in black and white or muted color.

Photographers spend lots of time in cramped dark rooms with red lights and chemicals that smell like egg farts.

Photographers get in heated exchanges about the direction Leica is headed or that one camera maker that sounds all german, hasselhoff?

Photographers have lots of lenses that they will tell you about whether you ask them or not, like the one that can see an ass hair on a mosquito or the remarkably “bright” one that can photograph the girl’s underwear tag from a tower in hell.

Photographers say “glass” a lot, “Thats a nice piece of glass you got there Carlos.” which would be funny if it was a joke. No it wouldn’t.

Photographers show you shoes hanging on wires, pink boxes in the green weeds, little black girls with blue eyes and nuns sitting under billboards of naked men.

Photographers have all kinds of cameras, most of them are rare and vintage but they love to remind you that their absolute favorite cameras are crappy plastic cameras they found at the thrift store for 25 cents.

Photographers LOVE Polaroid because you can take a picture of absolutely ANYTHING with a Polaroid and it will look like you got your BFA.

Photographers know the names of every other photographer who ever lived and they can tell you exactly who took the first picture of an old barn door or a naked girl on a sofa.

Photographers talk about how little they use photoshop IF AT ALL, and even then it’s only to “adjust some curves” or “make the blacks a little more black.”

Photographers make use of make up artists, hairdressers, location scouts and stylists which is way way WAY different than photoshopping out zits and wrinkles.

Photographers freeze moments to show the REALITY. They love that word, “reality” also they like to say “RAW” a lot.

Photographers have websites with big black or red sans serif fonts on white backgrounds.

Photographers put their client list at the bottom of the side bar where it looks like they don’t really care about it but just in case you didn’t like their photographs you can see who did.

Photographers list their accomplishments in a timeline so just in case you didn’t like their photographs you can see who did. Wait, did I just say that?

Photographers have strong opinions about Terry Richardson.

Photographers get upset about cropping.

Photographers like the anticipation, surprise, expense, delay, grain, smell, challenge, discipline, texture, and overall unpredictable “magic” of analog, soo opposite of effing digital.

Photographers use the word amateur to describe most other photographers.

Photographers miss the good old days when photography was expensive and out of reach to amateurs.

Photographers blame the lab a lot.

Photographers go to school to study photography because you can’t tell if a photo is good just by looking at it.

Photographers whisper cutting edge poetic gems like “digital has no soul.”

Photographers only really like 2 or 3 other photographers, the one’s whose photographs most resemble their own and they like to keep those books right out on the coffee table where everyone can see them.

Photographers think all commentary about photography and photographers is likely directed at them.

So yeah, I don’t give a stumbling poop about any of that stuff.

If considering all of above, I’m not a photographer, just a overprice digital camera owner which love to photograph my little kiddo….haha





Vision..

20 02 2011

Vision – It reaches beyond the thing that is, into the conception of what can be. Imagination gives you the picture. Vision gives you the impulse to make the picture your own.
Robert Collier

 

Many photographers tend to be gadget hounds. In their quest to make better pictures, they continually look for better equipment. The fact of the matter is; a good photographer with cheap gear will make better photographs than a bad photographer with the best gear. So what’s the secret behind great photographs? I believe the answer is vision.


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Who am I?..(what type of photographer am I?)

5 02 2011

By:Din Brasco

Who am I...

I get this question a lot: “What do you like to take pictures of?” And I’m never sure how to answer it. I like to take pictures of all kinds of things: landscape, seascape, portraits, birdies and occasionally candid; really, I like to take pictures of anything. And I feel bad that I don’t have that one thing that makes me a specific type of photographer. But surely I’m not get into wedding photography, and I will never get my hand into it….I really DON’T like weddings.

So, if you are one of the people who asks others what and why they photograph, stop for a moment and take a picture of something different today. And it doesn’t matter why you are a photographer—trying new things with your photography will help you look at what you normally photograph differently. And here is a really big secret: you don’t have to photograph outside the box! Check out others photographer web-gallery such as flickr for an idea of things you like and replicate them but not ‘copy’. Or if you hang out with other photographers no matter if they are just a newbies or 30 years of experience Pro, ask them what they like to photograph and give it a try.

some technicality: don’t have ones, because this photo are extensively use of textures…but off course main image taken with 50mm, f/4, ISO200





Creating Mood in Photography

17 10 2010

The night will come.., originally uploaded by DinBrasco.

Over time the art of photography has changed greatly, from the Kodak Brownie to the Canon Digital series. But one thing has not changed, and that is the creativity that can be achieved.
But what separates a good photograph from a great one? Technical skill is certainly important but is by no means the determining criteria. A technically superb photograph can be emotionless and flat if care is not taken. In fact, the number one determining factor for a great photograph is mood; the emotion conveyed in one image can, and should speak to the viewer and portray what the photographer was feeling in the moment that the image was taken.

But how does one capture emotion in a photograph? What is emotion or mood? Emotion in photography is thoughts, feelings, and ideas conveyed in a split second (the instant the photo was taken) that elicit the same or similar thoughts, feelings or ideas from the viewer. Sound complicated? In some ways it is, in others it is just a matter of common sense. This article will give several suggestions and techniques to better improve the emotion of your photographs.

The first step to improving the mood of your photographs is to simply stop and look around you. What do you see? Are there people moving quickly around you? Anyone sitting still? What demeanor does that person have? Is he smiling, frowning, or watching the sunset? All of these emotions can be captured on film, and can portray entirely different moods. Different expressions, varying angles, and different viewpoints can help to achieve emotion in images.

Another effective tool for achieving mood or tone of a photograph is the use of color. Bright contrasting colors give a sharp, hard hitting mood, while soft muted colors can give a sad, nostalgic or even romantic tone.

Another way to invoke emotion is through the use of Black and white photography. Black and white is perhaps the most creative medium available in photography. It can be used to convey many tones; classy, timeless, modern, and poignant are only a few. An image shot in color might appear to be a completely different image when shot in black and white.

Another way to infuse a photograph with emotion is to pay attention to the lighting conditions. A photograph taken in low light will present a much softer, more muted tone than one taken in the midday sun. The same
principle holds true for overcast skies and low lighting indoors. Another aspect of lighting is to watch for shadows. The shadows cast during midday will be different than those of the morning or early evening.

Different types of filters can be used to convey various tones or moods as well. A diffuser filter can be used to soften edges on images, giving a romantic tone. A polarizer can make color saturation appear deeper, and colored filters used with Black and white film can make overcast skies look quite sinister. There are many different filters on the market ranging from magnifying to every color of the rainbow. There is even one that has a rainbow on it so you can add a rainbow to your landscapes.

Technical skill is certainly important, and as more and more sophisticated equipment becomes available on the market it will continue to be an important part of photography. But infusing your photographs with emotion will make your photographs all the more unique and you’ll be able to take greater pride knowing that you captured that elusive shot, that special photograph that no one else has.